War and the Christian tradition.

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Commonweal , [New York
War -- Religious asp
Other titlesCommonweal.
The Physical Object
Pagination[4] p.
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Open LibraryOL19080728M

Allman's book is a good primer on ethical thinking about war in the Christian tradition. It's designed as a textbook, with discussion questions at the end of each chapter to prompt further investigation. Allman constructs a continuum of positions on war, the extremes being pacifism on one side and holy war on the other/5(8).

The lure of pacifism and the call to holy war have both found their champions in the Christian tradition.

Daryl Charles draws on the wisdom of Niebuhr, Ramsey, Elshtain and others to present a mediating position: the sanction of force by the state as a Cited by: 5.

Allman's book is a good primer on ethical thinking about war in the Christian tradition. It's designed as a textbook, with discussion questions at the end of each chapter to prompt further investigation. Allman constructs a continuum of positions on war, the extremes being pacifism on one side and holy war on the other/5(9).

The authors immediately make an important distinction between the Christian tradition of justifiable war in order to defend the people of God from unprovoked aggression and the Islamic ideal of jihad that defends the idea of launching attacks upon non-Muslim neighbors for the purpose of extending Muslim controlled by: 5.

No question, regardless of difficulty, is off-limits for Charles and Demy, whose own perspectives are generously rooted in the natural moral law inscribed on the human heart, in a Christian worldview revealed in Scripture, and in the classic just-war tradition, which eschews both militarism and pacifism.4/5(4).

War, Peace, and the Christian Tradition, Dr. Mark J. Allman asks a provocative, timely, and timeless question.

Readable and thought-provoking, Who Would Jesus Kill. Provides an overview of A concise, provocative look at the continuum of approaches to war and peace within the Christian tradition and beyond: pacifism, holy war, and just war/5. A concise, provocative look at the continuum of approaches to war and peace within the Christian tradition and beyond: pacifism, holy war, and just war.

In Who Would Jesus Kill. War, Peace, and the Christian Tradition, Dr. Mark J. Allman asks a provocative, timely, and timeless question.

Description War and the Christian tradition. FB2

Readable and thought-provoking, Who Would Jesus Kill?5/5(1). Daniel Bells book is an important work that attempts to re-center the tradition of just war on the church instead of the state. To make his case, Bell distinguishes Just War as Christian Discipleship (CD) from Public Policy Checklist ("PPC," Throughout his book, Bell uses upper case in reference to just war/5.

Just War Tradition. The just war tradition (JWT) arose from a desire to have the Christian faith influence the terrible necessity of warfare.

Just War Tradition allows Christians to evaluate potential conflicts and to influence other conflicts once they have begun.

This bold work challenges two popular conceptions of religionas either the instigator of conflict or the propagator of peace. Martin, one of the world's leading sociologists of religion, rejects both as oversimplifications, and draws on case studies from Britain, the US, Latin American, and Romania to argue for a more nuanced, complex approach that takes account of the role of Pages:   The Civil War is an interesting war that forever changed the United States.

I always find it intriguing to read books from people on both opposing sides. You get a different perspective and I think that is important whenever learning history.

I also love reading books set during the late 19th century. “World War I reshaped and remapped the major religious traditions.” That is especially true of Christianity, Judaism, and Islam, the triple focus of Jenkins’ well-received book. Just War as Christian Discipleship argues that most Americans, seeking to explain their positions on war via the just war tradition in Christianity, actually know little or nothing about what constitutes just war.

In this book Daniel Bell seeks to change this lack of knowledge by explicating the history of just war theory, and then applying this information towards 4/5(1). The book of Ephesians powerfully teaches that because of God's victory in Christ, the Christian wages war neither for land nor for a place in the world.

The whole world sits under the authority of Christ (Matthew ), and so the world is the Lord's. "The World of War in Christian Tradition" published on 01 Jan by : Laury Sarti. Daniel M. Bell Jr.’s Just War as Christian Discipleship struck me as simply an impossibility.

To think that the just war tradition will find a restful place in a more Christian orientation is, to my way of thinking, naïve. Bell gives a helpful.

War on Christmas, The: Battles in Faith, Tradition, and Religious Expression - PDF Download [Download] () by Bodie Hodge Hear about sales, receive special offers & more.

You can unsubscribe at any time. Charles diagnoses several serious problems with much contemporary Christian thinking, teaching, and discourse about the morality of warfare, whose remedy lies in reappropriation of the Christian tradition (s) of just war thinking. Lack of attention to, and in many quarters almost entire ignorance of, /5.

The Virtue of War: Reclaiming the Classic Christian Traditions East and West Alexander F.C. Webster and Darrell Cole, Regina Orthodox Press, reviewed by Fr. Andrew Louth. review published in In Communion, Springissue This book is a work of polemic.

The lure of pacifism and the call to holy war have both found their champions in the Christian tradition. Daryl Charles draws on the wisdom of Niebuhr, Ramsey, Elshtain and others to present a mediating position: the sanction of force by the state as a Pages:   Orthodox theologians Alexander F.

Webster and Darrell Cole remind us of this fact in The Virtue of War, an important apologia for the Christian tradition of the just war. Webster and Cole begin with the turmoil democracies - centered primarily in nations with a Christian tradition - face with the onslaught of Islamic terrorism as in the 9/11 Cited by: 5.

Buy a cheap copy of Who Would Jesus Kill: War, Peace, and book by Mark J. Allman. A concise, provocative look at the continuum of approaches to war and peace within the Christian tradition and beyond: pacifism, holy war, and just war.

The Biblical and Christian Roots of the Just War Tradition The Christian tradition of just war theory began in the fifth century with Augustine. Augustine’s view of justice in warfare can be summed up by his statement that, “We do not seek peace in order to be at war, but we go to war that we may have peace.

Christians have held diverse views towards violence and non-violence through time. Currently and historically there have been four views and practices within Christianity toward violence and war: non-resistance, Christian pacifism, just war, and preventive war (Holy war, e.g., the Crusades).

The early church in the Roman empire adopted a nonviolent stance when it came to war since. War, Peace, and the Christian Tradition, Dr.

Mark J. Allman asks a provocative, timely, and timeless question.

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Readable and thought-provoking, Who Would Jesus Kill. Provides an overview of approaches to war and peace within the Christian : $   This provocative and timely primer on the just war tradition connects just war to the concrete practices and challenges of the Christian life.

Daniel Bell explains that the point is not simply to know the just war tradition but to live it even in the face of the tremendous difficulties associated with : Baker Publishing Group.

Christianity, major religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus of Nazareth in the 1st century CE. It has become the largest of the world’s religions and, geographically, the most widely diffused.

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Learn about the history of Christianity, its doctrines, and the major Christian traditions. Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library. Abstract.

This chapter examines how Reinhold Niebuhr’s Christian realism departs in fundamental and profound ways from the classical just war tradition and explains why this short, Niebuhrian realism proceeds from a liberal theology that rejects much of the theological and philosophical orthodoxy associated with the broad natural law tradition and its progeny just war Cited by: 1.

Christian pacifists state that Jesus himself was a pacifist who taught and practiced pacifism and that his followers must do likewise.

Notable Christian pacifists include Martin Luther King, Jr., Leo Tolstoy, and Ammon Hennacy. Hennacy believed that adherence to Christianity required not just pacifism but.

Pope St Fabian and Saint Sebastian, Giovanni di Paolo. The martyrdom of St. Alban, from a 13th-century manuscript, now in the Trinity College Library, Dublin.

Note the executioner's eyes falling out of his head. According to early Christian tradition. With some historical attestation within a hundred years of the event.

Polycarp of Smyrna.Editors Note: This collection is excerpted from the book 25 Books Every Christian Should Read with an introduction by the book’s editor, Julia L. Roller. Throughout the centuries certain books have had a tremendous influence on Christians across traditions and cultures. The ideas expressed in these seminal works have shaped the history not.Featuring an exceptionally lucid writing style and a holistic, integrated approach, The Christian Tradition: A Historical and Theological Introduction traces the history of Christianity across the world from its earliest origins up to the present.